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Hugginstown RIC Barracks, attack and capture - the aftermath

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“Supported by the Department of Tourism,  Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media under the Decade of Centenaries 2012-2023 initiative.”

The first RIC barracks capture in Leinster – Hugginstown, March 1920

Historian and Author Eoin Swithin Walsh explores the capture of the RIC Barracks in Hugginstown in 1920

Hugginstown RIC Barracks, attack and capture - the aftermath

In the aftermath of the Hugginstown Barracks attack, an inquest was heard to try find out what had occurred. The Bishop of Ossory had stern words for the men who took part. Bridget Ryan, wife of the deceased constable, also had a long ordeal trying to get some form of compensation for her husband's death. Meanwhile, the Crown Forces rounded up a lot of young men from the area and interned them in prisons in Belfast and London. These men would eventually go on hunger-strike. Eventually, they were released and they all received heroes' welcomes on their return to Kilkenny. The county had changed much since they left; most notably, a large portion of the RIC barracks that had dotted the Kilkenny countryside had been destroyed in the meantime.

Hugginstown-aftermath-Mar-1920---eoin-swithin-walsh.mp3 (size 13.4 MB)

Group of those arrested after the Hugginstown attack